Monday, March 15, 2010

Beware the Ides of March



On the Ides of March (March 15th) Julius Caesar was stabbed to death in the Roman Senate by Brutus, Cassius, and 60 other co-conspirators. Caesar had been warned by a Seer to be on his guard against a great peril on the Ides of March. This warning is most famously dramatized in William Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar, with the words (spoken by said Seer) “beware the Ides of March.” The other famous Shakespearean phrase from this same play is “Et tu, Brute?” which was spoken by Caesar when the “unkindest cut” was inflicted by Caesar’s friend Brutus. (Fortunately, I have not needed to remember that line a whole lot—exept, perhaps, in jest.)

However, for the past fifty years, on the 15th of March, I have remembered, “beware the Ides of March.” I am happy to report that I do not recall anything horrible happening to me on all those Ides of March for these many years. I think I remember it because it just sounds profound or spooky to mutter under my breath, “beware the Ides of March!”

This year, however, the Ides of March may prove to be bad luck for many people. That is because of Daylight Savings time. Someone figured out that there is a 17 percent increase in fatal accidents on the Monday following the time change! So, be careful out there: we don’t want THIS Ides of March to be one to remember…. (Except with humor! :))




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3 comments:

shydandelion said...

Eeya. I will have to stay in bed just in case...

Trillium said...

Yes. The accidents are caused by sleep deprivation! So here is a good excuse for snoozing-in--or taking a nap!

Rebecca said...

It's funny that your wrote about this... my co-worker, Janet, just said this morning "Beware the Ides of March"

And she is a bit of a history buff and relayed the same information to me that you shared in your blog.

How fascinating!